Education

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  1. University of California, Santa Barbara (Santa Barbara, CA)

    Program: M.A. / Ph.D. in Linguistics

  2. LSA Linguistic Institute (Boulder, CO)

  3. School for International Training (SIT) (Nairobi, Kenya)

    Program: Development, Health & Society

    • Independent Research Project: Language change & variation in Mombasa: Recent trends in Kimvita Swahili

  4. School for International Training (SIT) (Mombasa, Kenya)

    Program: Swahili Studies & Coastal Cultures

    • Independent Research Project: What’s in a word? Code-switching in Mombasa Swahili

  5. The College of William & Mary (Williamsburg, VA)

    • B.A., Linguistics & Philosophy (double major), 2008

    • magna cum laude

Professional Experience

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  1. —present

    Postdoctoral Researcher, University of Alberta Language Technology Lab (ALTLab)

  2. Editor, Rosetta Stone Custom Languages

  3. Teaching Assistant, UC Santa Barbara Department of Linguistics

  4. Research Assistant, UC Santa Barbara Graduate Division

  5. Spanish Instructor, Nielsen Builders

  6. Lab Assistant, Language Lab, The College of William & Mary

  7. Latin Instructor, Bridgewater Home School Unit

Teaching

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  1. Introduction to Language & Linguistics (Teaching Assistant, UC Santa Barbara)

    Introduction to the scientific study of language: The sounds of language; word and sentence structure; semantics and pragmatics; discourse and conversational speech; the social and cultural functions of language; language change and the reconstruction of languages at earlier stages.

    • Summer 2014 (1 section)
  2. Language & Life (Teaching Assistant, UC Santa Barbara)

    The diversity and history of languages; their norms, conventions, and written traditions; the role of language in culture and identity; language rights and multilingualism, and the implications of technology for language use. Focused especially on linguistics as a science and the scientific method, as well as natural vs. artificial languages.

    • Spring 2016 (2 sections)
    • Spring 2017 (2 sections)
  3. Language, Race, & Ethnicity (Teaching Assistant, UC Santa Barbara)

    Linguistic practices of major ethnoracial groups in the United States, including African Americans, Asian Americans, European Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans; examination of the linguistic effects of immigration and colonialism; bilingualism, code switching, style shifting, language shift, and heritage language learning; linguistic interaction and contact between ethnoracial groups; language as a resource for ethnoracial identity; linguistic racism; linguistic activism.

    • Fall 2020 (2 sections)
  4. Phonetics (Teaching Assistant, UC Santa Barbara)

    An introduction to the articulatory and acoustic properties of speech sounds. Survey of speech sounds found in the languages of the world. Emphasis on ear training and transcription using the International Phonetic Alphabet.

    • Fall 2017 (2 sections)
  5. Research Assistantship in Linguistics (Undergraduate Advisor, UC Santa Barbara)

    • Worked with two undergraduate assistants to transcribe J. P. Harrington’s notebooks on Obispeño Chumash. (Fall / Winter 2013)

    • Worked with six undergraduate assistants to compile data from a year-long field methods class on Tlahuapa Mixtec into a single searchable lexicon and database of texts. (2016–2017)

    • Worked with two undergraduate research assistants at U Wisconsin-Madison who assisted with development of the Digital Linguistics (DLx) project. (2019–present)

Awards & Honors

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  1. National Science Foundation (NSF) Documenting Endangered Languages (DEL) Grant #1953103

    Principal Investigator: Monica Macaulay (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

    My Contribution: Data Management Plan

    Project Title: Comparative Database of the Derivational Morphology of a Language Family

    Amount: $324,209

    Description: A database of morphological components in Algonquian languages.

  2. SSILA Best Student Presentation Award

    For my talk, ‘Ergativity in Chitimacha’, presented at the winter meeting of the Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas (SSILA), New York City.

  3. Doctoral Student Travel Grant

    Funding provided by the Academic Senate. $900 for travel and lodging at LSA 2019 in New York City.

  4. National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Student Research Fellowship (GRFP)

    For dissertation research on the typology of lexical categories. $34,000 stipend plus $12,000 tuition remission per year for 3 years. NSF DGE 1144085.

  5. Winner, UC Santa Barbara Grad Slam

    Campus-wide competition for the best 3-minute research talk by a graduate student. Presented on Chitimacha language revitalization. $5,000 prize.

  6. 2nd place, University of California Grad Slam

    UC-wide competition for the best 3-minute research talk by a graduate student. Presented on Chitimacha language revitalization. $3,000 prize.

  7. LSA CoLang Scholarship

    For attendance at the 2014 Institute on Collaborative Language Research. $375 towards registration costs.

  8. Chancellor’s Fellowship, UC Santa Barbara

    Central campus fellowship to attend the M.A./Ph.D. program in linguistics at UC Santa Barbara. $24,000/yr. for 3 years, plus $5,000 summer research funding in my first year.

  9. Boren Scholarship, National Security Education Program (NSEP)

    For study abroad and independent research over in Kenya. $20,000 over 2 semesters. (I declined the scholarship because a travel warning made the funds no longer useable in Kenya.)

  10. Excellence in Language Scholarship, Turner Ashby High School

    For outstanding academic performance in foreign languages. $500 towards college tuition.

Publications & Presentations

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Edited Volumes

  1. Working Papers in Athabaskan (Dene) Languages 2012

    Alaska Native Language Center Working Papers 11, eds. Sharon Hargus, Edward Vajda, Daniel W. Hieber. ANLC.

Peer-Reviewed Articles & Chapters

  1. Chitimacha

    In Carmen Jany, Keren Rice, & Marianne Mithun (eds.), The languages and linguistics of indigenous North America: A comprehensive guide (The World of Linguistics 13). Mouton de Gruyter.

  2. Word classes

    In Carmen Jany, Keren Rice, & Marianne Mithun (eds.), The languages and linguistics of indigenous North America: A comprehensive guide (The World of Linguistics 13). Mouton de Gruyter.

  3. The Chitimacha language: A history

    In Nathalie Dajko & Shana Walton (eds.), Language in Louisiana: Community & culture (America’s Third Coast Series), pp. 9–27. University Press of Mississippi.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.2307/j.ctvkwnnm1.7

  4. Semantic alignment in Chitimacha

    International Journal of American Linguistics 85(3): 313–363.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.1086/703239

  5. Category genesis in Chitimacha: A constructional approach

    In Kristel Van Goethem, Muriel Norde, Evie Coussé, & Gudrun Vanderbauwhede (eds.), Category change from a constructional perspective (Constructional Approaches to Language 20), 15–46. John Benjamins.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.1075/cal.20.02hie

  6. On linguistics, linguists, and our times: A linguist’s personal narrative reviewed

    Linguistic Typology 17(2): 291–321. Review article of R. M. W. Dixon. 2010. I am a linguist. Brill.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/lity-2013-0013

Workshops, Presentations, & Posters

  1. Lexical flexibility: Expanding the empirical coverage

    Doctoral colloquium given to the Linguistics Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, November 12.

    DOI: http://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.31867.85288

  2. Lexical flexibility in English: A preliminary study

    Invited talk presented to the Linguistics department at the College of William & Mary, October 15, 2019, Williamsburg, VA.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.33601.71528

  3. New words needed: A comparative database for Algonquian lexical information

    (with Monica Macaulay & Hunter T. Lockwood). Presented at the Symposium on Historical-Comparative Linguistics for Language Revitalization, June 29–30, University of California, Davis.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.35434.26568

  4. Digital Linguistics for language documentation

    Invited lecture presented to the Language Documentation seminar, taught by Prof. Carol Genetti, at the University of California, Santa Barbara Linguistics department, May 24, 2019.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.13238.96329

  5. Optional subject marking in Chitimacha

    Talk presented at the 55th Annual Meeting of the Chicago Linguistics Society, May 16–18, 2019.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.25821.87526

  6. Ergativity in Chitimacha

    Talk presented at the winter meeting of the Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas (SSILA), Jan. 3–6, New York, NY. Winner of SSILA’s Best Student Presentation Award for 2019.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.28723.37923

  7. Nominal alignment in Chitimacha

    Talk presented at the 21st Annual Workshop on American Indigenous Languages (WAIL), April 20–21, University of California, Santa Barbara.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.32078.82240

  8. Lessons from an isolate: Chitimacha diachrony in areal perspective

    Invited talk presented at:

    • UCLA American Indian Seminar, May 9, 2017, Los Angeles, CA
    • University of Wisconsin-Madison Linguistics Department, March 2, 2018
    • University of California, Berkeley Fieldwork Forum (FForum), April 18, 2018

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.25367.93605

  9. Chitimacha diachrony in areal perspective: Lessons from an isolate

    Talk presented at the Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas (SSILA), Jan. 4–7, Salt Lake City, UT.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.33756.54409

  10. Prosody and cohesion in Ékegusií (Kisii) narrative

    Talk presented at the 26th Annual Linguistics Symposium, April 12, 2017 at California State University, Fullerton.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.27045.65764

  11. Indeterminate valency and verbal ambivalence in Chitimacha

    Talk presented at the Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas (SSILA), Jan. 5–8, Austin, TX.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.36482.84164

  12. The cohesive function of prosody in Ekegusii (Kisii) narratives

    Talk presented to the Discourse Workshop, Department of Linguistics, University of California, Santa Barbara.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.33127.39846

  13. Non-autonomous valency-changing devices in Chitimacha

    19th Annual Workshop on American Indigenous Languages (WAIL), May 6–7, University of California, Santa Barbara.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.19705.62565

  14. How to become a Kisii folktale: Generic features of moralizing narratives among the Gusii people of Kenya

    Talk presented at the Language, Interaction, & Social Organization Symposium (LISO) special session on Interaction & Culture Across Languages: Perspectives from Field Linguistics, April 8, 2016, University of California, Santa Barbara.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.34805.12003

  15. The extension of structure from morphology to discourse

    Talk presented at the Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas (SSILA), Jan. 7—10, Washington, D.C.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.28094.23369

  16. Renaissance on the bayou: Revitalizing the Chitimacha language

    Award-winning 3-minute talk on my work with the Chitimacha language, presented as part of the University of California Grad Slam competition for the best 3-minute research talk by a graduate student. Won 1st place in the UC Santa Barbara Finals, and 2nd place in the University of California Grand Finals.

  17. The start and the end of it: Prosodic marking of speech report boundaries in Dolakha Newar

    (with Carol Genetti) Plenary talk given to the South Asian Languages Conference, May 15, 2015, London, UK.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.31449.67688

  18. Category genesis through schematicity: On the origin of Chitimacha preverbs

    Paper presented at the UC Santa Barbara Linguistics Department’s Silver Anniversary Conference, October 11, University of California, Santa Barbara.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.24738.79042

  19. Documentation and revitalization of Ékegusií language and culture

    Invited talk given to the Ékegusií Encyclopedia Project, Mombasa, Kenya.

  20. Degrees and dimensions of grammaticalization in Chitimacha preverbs

    17th Annual Workshop on American Indigenous Languages (WAIL), University of California, Santa Barbara.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.35643.98080

  21. Building the lexicon for reawakening languages

    Conference on Language Revitalization: Sleeping & Awakening Languages of the Gulf South, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.10478.15686

  22. Semantic alignment in Chitimacha

    Winter Meeting of the Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas (SSILA), Minneapolis, MN.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.22641.63840

  23. The politically incorrect guide to language death

    Invited guest lecture, Anthropology 305: ‘Language & Culture’, Professor Amy L. Paugh, Department of Anthropology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.25997.08169

  24. Rosetta Stone & Navajo Language Renaissance

    With Lorraine Begay Manavi & Kasra Manavi. Invited keynote, Athabaskan (Dene) Languages Conference, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.12575.30887

  25. Digital collaboration: 21st century tools for revitalization

    Poster presentation for the conference on Language Revitalization in the 21st Century: Going global, staying local, CUNY, New York, NY.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.34385.68964

  26. Language endangerment and nationalism

    Invited talk co-sponsored by the Latin American Studies Program and the Arts & Sciences Lectures Committee, The College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.27674.80327

  27. Language endangerment: A history

    Invited guest lecture, Anthropology 305: ‘Language & Culture’ Professor Amy L. Paugh, Department of Anthropology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.31030.24643

  28. Canonical Typology

    Lecture given to the Content Development department, Rosetta Stone, Harrisonburg, VA.

  29. A case study in digital collaboration: Navajo Language Renaissance & Rosetta Stone Navajo

    With Lorraine Begay Manavi & Marion K. Bittinger. Stabilizing Indigenous Languages Symposium (SILS), Albuquerque, NM.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.17608.47364

  30. Language revitalization: Issues with reference to Navajo

    With Marion K. Bittinger. Invited guest lecture, Anthropology 305: ‘Language & Culture’ Professor Amy L. Paugh, Department of Anthropology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA.

  31. Language revitalization: Navajo

    With Marion K. Bittinger. Invited guest lecture, Anthropology 305: ‘Language & Culture’ Professor Amy L. Paugh, Department of Anthropology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA.

  32. Elicitation techniques

    Invited talk, Content Development Department, Rosetta Stone, Harrisonburg, VA.

    DOI: https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.24319.36008

Online Articles

  1. Renaissance on the bayou: Revitalizing the Chitimacha language

    Published in:

  2. Language as action

    Mises Daily, Ludwig von Mises Institute.

  3. Why do languages die?

    Mises Daily, Ludwig von Mises Institute.

Book Reviews

Projects

  1. Digital Linguistics (DLx)

    Development of web-based tools for managing and analyzing linguistic data. Visit digitallinguistics.io for more details.

  2. Rosetta Stone Luiseño (Chamtéela)

    Rosetta Stone language-learning software for the Pechanga dialect of the Luiseño language of southern California.

  3. Rosetta Stone Iñupiaq (Iñupiatun)

    Iñupiaq version of the Rosetta Stone language learning software. Not available for public purchase.

  4. Rosetta Stone Navajo (Diné bizaad)

    Rosetta Stone language-learning software for the Navajo language. Available for purchase from the nonprofit organization Navajo Language Renaissance here. Proceeds go directly towards continued language revitalization efforts.

  5. Rosetta Stone Chitimacha (Sitimaxa)

    Rosetta Stone language-learning software for the Chitimacha language. Not available for public purchase.

Unpublished Manuscripts

  1. Building the lexicon for awakening languages

    Chapter prepared for the Conference on Language Revitalization: Sleeping & Awakened Languages of the Gulf South, Tulane University. (Proceedings were never published.)

  2. To be not or to not be: A Behavioral Profile approach to the semantics of Chitimacha negation

    Term paper, ‘Semantics’, Prof. Stefan Th. Gries, Winter 2015, UC Santa Barbara.

  3. Assessing the Chitimacha-Totozoquean hypothesis

    Term paper, ‘Language & Prehistory’, Prof. Laura Robinson, Spring 2014, UC Santa Barbara.

Non-Linguistic Publications

  1. Growing up

    In Lynn K. Talbot & Andrew Talbot Squires (eds.), Following the yellow arrow: Younger pilgrims on the Camino. Wingspan Press.

Service

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  1. Advisory Council Member, Institute for Collaborative Language Documentation (CoLang)

  2. Proofreader, Language Science Press

  3. Webmaster, Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas (SSILA)

  4. Webmaster, Social Media Subcommittee, LSA Committee on Endangered Languages and Their Preservation (CELP)

  5. Reviewer, Libertarian Papers

Professional Memberships

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  1. Association for Linguistic Typology (ALT)

  2. Foundation for Endangered Languages (FEL)

  3. Linguistic Society of America (LSA)

  4. Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas (SSILA)

Fieldwork & Descriptive Work

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  1. Santa Barbara, California. One-year graduate-level field methods class working with a speaker of Tlahuapa Mixtec, followed by ongoing work on a lexical database.

  2. Kisii, Kenya. Two months of fieldwork near Kisii Town in southwestern Kenya, recording conversation, traditional songs, and folktales in the Gusii (Ékegusií) language.

  3. Anchorage, AK. Two weeks of elicitation with a native speaker of the Point Hope dialect of Iñupiaq.

  4. —present

    Chitimacha Tribal Reservation. Ongoing preparation of a Chitimacha dictionary, text collection, and grammar from archival sources. Completed Rosetta Stone language-learning software for Chitimacha in 2010.

  5. Rosetta Stone. Daily elicitation sessions with speakers of Navajo and Iñupiaq for the purpose of creating Rosetta Stone language-learning software. Included both long-distance elicitation and numerous field visits, generally for two weeks at a time.

  6. Williamsburg, VA. A one-semester undergraduate descriptive linguistics / field methods class with a native speaker of Turkish.

  7. Mombasa, Kenya. Two semesters researching language shift in the Kimvita (Mombasa) dialect of Swahili. Worked primarily with youth speakers collecting recorded texts for analysis.

Languages Spoken & Studied

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  1. Chitimacha (Sitimaxa)

    structural knowledge

  2. French (français)

    beginner

  3. Gusii (Ékegusií)

    structural knowledge

  4. Iñupiaq (Iñupiatun)

    structural knowledge

  5. Latin (lingua Latina)

    intermediate

  6. Navajo (Diné bizaad)

    structural knowledge

  7. Pechanga Luiseño (Chamtéela)

    structural knowledge

  8. Plains Cree (nêhiyawêwin)

    structural knowledge

  9. Spanish (español)

    intermediate

  10. Swahili (Kiswahili)

    advanced

  11. Tlahuapa Mixtec (Tù'un Sàví)

    structural knowledge

  12. Turkish (Türkçe)

    structural knowledge

Skills & Proficiencies

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Technical Skills

  1. CSS

  2. Database Design & Management

  3. Digital Audio/Video Recording

  4. HTML

  5. JavaScript / Node.js

  6. LaTeX

  7. R

  8. SQL

  9. Web Hosting

  10. git

Software Proficiencies

  1. ELAN

  2. Fieldworks Language Explorer (FLEx)

  3. GitHub

  4. LexiquePro

  5. Mendeley

  6. Microsoft Office

  7. Praat

  8. RStudio

  9. Saymore

  10. Toolbox

Media About Me

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  1. American soft power has helped this Kenyan man's efforts to ensure a future for his mother tongue, by Patrick Cox. Public Radio International

  2. Graduate student in the spotlight: Daniel Hieber on revitalizing languages, rock climbing, and research motivation, by Melissa Rapp. UCSB GradPost

  3. UCSB Ph.D. student Daniel Hieber takes second place in inaugural UC Grad Slam, by Patricia Marroquin. Noozhawk

  4. For UCSB linguistics Ph.D. student Daniel Hieber, a second-place win in inaugural UC Grad Slam was the ‘icing on the cake’, by Patricia Marroquin. UCSB GradPost

  5. UC students’ research wows judges at Grad Slam competition, by Nanette Asimov. San Francisco Chronicle

  6. The three-minute challenge: Graduate student in linguistics goes on to compete in the first UC-wide competition on May 4, by Julie Cohen. UC Santa Barbara Current

  7. Grad Slam 2015 Final Round for UCSB: The right to represent, by Kyle Crocco. UCSB GradPost

  8. UC Grad Slam tests scholars’ communication skills, by Carolyn McMillian. University of California Press Room

  9. 10 linguistics students receive NSF graduate fellowships, by Linguistic Society of America. LinguisticSociety.org

  10. CoLang 2014 scholarship recipients announced, by Linguistic Society of America. LinguisticSociety.org

Professional References

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  1. Marianne Mithun

    Professor, Department of Linguistics

    University of California, Santa Barbara

    mithun@linguistics.ucsb.edu

  2. Bernard Comrie

    Professor, Department of Linguistics

    University of California, Santa Barbara

    comrie@linguistics.ucsb.edu

  3. Stefan Th. Gries

    Professor

    University of California, Santa Barbara

    stgries@linguistics.ucsb.edu

  4. Monica Macaulay

    Professor, Department of Language Sciences

    University of Wisconsin-Madison

    mmacaula@wisc.edu

  5. Carol Genetti

    Vice Provost for Graduate & Postdoctoral Programs

    NYU Abu Dhabi

    (805) 893-3574

    cgenetti@linguistics.ucsb.edu

  6. William Croft

    Professor Emeritus, Department of Linguistics

    University of New Mexico

    wcroft@unm.edu

  7. Marion K. Bittinger

    Director, Endangered Language Program

    Rosetta Stone

    (540) 248-3310

    mkbittinger@gmail.com

  8. Kim Walden

    Cultural Director, Chitimacha Cultural Department

    Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana

    (337) 923-9923

    kim@chitimacha.gov

  9. Jack B. Martin

    Boyd Associate Professor of English & Linguistics

    The College of William & Mary

    (757) 221-3906

    jbmart@wm.edu

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