Daniel W. Hieber

Graduate Student in Linguistics

University of California, Santa Barbara

dhieber@umail.ucsb.edu

University of California, Santa Barbara

Department of Linguistics

South Hall 3432

Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3100

Last updated:

Education

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  1. 2013—present

    University of California, Santa Barbara (Santa Barbara, CA)

    Program: M.A. / Ph.D. in Linguistics

    • Chancellor’s Fellowship Recipient

  2. 2011

    LSA Linguistic Institute (Boulder, CO)

  3. 2007

    School for International Training (SIT) (Nairobi, Kenya)

    Program: Development, Health, & Society

    • Independent Research Project: Language change & variation in Mombasa: Recent trends in Kimvita Swahili

  4. 2006

    School for International Training (SIT) (Mombasa, Kenya)

    Program: Swahili Studies & Coastal Cultures

    • Independent Research Project: What’s in a word? Code-switching in Mombasa Swahili

  5. 2004—2008

    The College of William & Mary (Williamsburg, VA)

    Program: B.A. in Linguistics, Philosophy (double major)

    • magna cum laude

Awards & Honors

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  1. Graduate Student Research Fellowship (GRFP), National Science Foundation (NSF). For dissertation research on the typology of lexical categories. $34,000 stipend plus $12,000 tuition remission per year for 3 years. NSF DGE 1144085.

  2. Winner, UC Santa Barbara Grad Slam. Campus-wide competition for the best 3-minute research talk by a graduate student. Presented on Chitimacha langauge revitalization. $5,000 prize.

  3. 2nd place, University of California Grad Slam. UC-wide competition for the best 3-minute research talk by a graduate student. Presented on Chitimacha language revitalization. $3,000 prize.

  4. Honorable Mention, Graduate Research Fellowship (GRFP), National Science Foundation (NSF).

  5. LSA CoLang Scholarship. For attendance at the 2014 Institute on Collaborative Language Research. $375 towards registration costs.

  6. Chancellor’s Fellowship, UC Santa Barbara. Central campus fellowship to attend the M.A./Ph.D. program in linguistics at UC Santa Barbara. $24,000/yr. for 3 years, plus $5,000 summer research funding in year 1.

  7. Boren Scholarship, National Security Education Program (NSEP). For study abroad and independent research over in Kenya. $20,000 over 2 semesters. (I declined the scholarship because a travel warning made the funds no longer useable in Kenya.)

  8. National Honor Society.

  9. National Foreign Language Honor Society.

  10. Excellence in Language Scholarship, Turner Ashby High School. For outstanding academic performance in foreign languages. $500 towards college tuition.

Professional Experience

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  1. 2012—2013

    Editor, Rosetta Stone

    • created lesson content for commerical language products

    • used language typology to create products more appropriate for specific languages

    • managed lexical database and linguistic corpora, and used them for insights into language products and our learners

  2. 2011—2012

    Associate Researcher, Rosetta Stone Research Labs

    • conducted applied research in linguistics, typology, acquisition, and pedagogy as it related to company initiatives

    • designed and prototyped new products and features

    • gave company-internal presentations on a variety of linguistic and typological topics

  3. 2008—2011

    Editor, Rosetta Stone Endangered Language Program

    • created language-learning software for the Chitimacha, Navajo, Iñupiaq, Inuttitut, and Mohawk languages

    • conducted daily elicitation sessions, both long-distance and on-site, with native speakers

    • made numerous site visits for elicitation, recording, and photography

    • designed culturally-relevant, immersion-based language lessons

    • provided linguistic consulting to indigenous communities on language planning, immersion teaching, documentation, and basic linguistics

    • managed program interns

  4. 2007—2008
  5. 2006

    Spanish Instructor, Nielsen Builders

  6. 2004—2006

    Lab Assistant, Language Labs, The College of William & Mary

  7. 2003—2004

    Latin Instructor, Bridgewater Home School Unit

Publications & Presentations

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Books

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Edited Volumes

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  1. Working Papers in Athabaskan (Dene) Languages 2012.

    (Alaska Native Language Center Working Papers 11), eds. Sharon Hargus, Edward Vajda, Daniel W. Hieber. ANLC.

    (purchase)

Refereed Articles

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  1. Category genesis in Chitimacha: A constructional approach.

    To appear in Kristel Van Goethem, Muriel Norde, Evie Coussé, & Gudrun Vanderbauwhede (eds.), Categorization and category change from a constructional perspective (Constructional Approaches to Language). John Benjamins.

  2. On linguistics, linguists, and our times: A linguist’s personal narrative reviewed.

    Linguistic Typology 17(2): 291–321. Review article of R. M. W. Dixon. 2010. I am a linguist. Brill. DOI: 10.1515/lity-2013-0013.

    (view online) (pdf)

  3. Growing up.

    In Lynn K. Talbot & Andrew Talbot Squires (eds.), Following the yellow arrow: Younger pilgrims on the Camino. Wingspan Press.

    (purchase)

Book Chapters

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Workshops & Presentations

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  1. How to become a Kisii folktalke: Generic features of moralizing narratives among the Gusii people of Kenya.

    Talk presented at the Language, Interaction, & Social Organization Symposium (LISO) special session on Interaction & Culture Across Languages: Perspectives from Field Linguistics, University of California, Santa Barbara.

  2. The extension of structure to discourse: Chitimacha participles in discourse and diachrony.

    Talk presented at the Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas (SSILA), Jan. 7—10, Washington, D.C.

    (slides)

  3. Renaissance on the bayou: Revitalizing the Chitimacha language.

    Award-winning 3-minute talk on my work with the Chitimacha language, presented as part of the University of California Grad Slam competition for the best 3-minute research talk by a graduate student. Watch the video here.

    (view online)

  4. The start and the end of it: Prosodic marking of speech report boundaries in Dolakha Newar.

    (with Carol Genetti) Plenary talk given to the South Asian Languages Conference.

  5. Documentation & revitalization of Ékegusií language & culture.

    Invited talk to the Ékegusií Encyclopedia Project, Mombasa, Kenya.

    (slides)

  6. Category genesis through schematicity: On the origin of Chitimacha preverbs.

    Paper presented at the UC Santa Barbara Linguistics Department’s Silver Anniversary Conference, University of California, Santa Barbara.

    (slides)

  7. Degrees & dimensions of grammaticalization in Chitimacha preverbs.

    17th Annual Workshop on American Indigenous Languages (WAIL), University of California, Santa Barbara.

    (slides)

  8. Building the lexion for reawakening languages.

    Conference on Language Revitalization: Sleeping & Awakening Languages of the Gulf South, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA.

    (slides)

  9. Semantic alignment in Chitimacha.

    Winter Meeting of the Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas (SSILA), Minneapolis, MN.

    (slides)

  10. Linguistics in industry.

    Invited talk, UCSB Linguistics Club, Santa Barbara, CA.

    (slides)

  11. Digital collaboration: 21st century tools for revitalization.

    Poster presented at the Language Revitalization in the 21st Century.

  12. An introduction to typology.

    Three-part lecture series. Rosetta Stone, Harrisonburg, VA.

  13. The politically incorrect guide to language death.

    Invited guest lecture, Anthropology 305: ‘Language & Culture’, Professor Amy L. Paugh, Department of Anthropology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA.

  14. Language endangerment & nationalism.

    Invited talk co-sponsored by the Latin American Studies Program and the Arts & Sciences Lectures Committee, The College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA.

    (slides)

  15. Rapid reading.

    Content Development Department, Rosetta Stone, Harrisonburg, VA.

    (slides)

  16. Rosetta Stone & Navajo Language Renaissance.

    With Lorraine Begay Manavi & Kasra Manavi. Invited keynote, Athabaskan (Dene) Languages Conference, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA.

    (slides)

  17. Language revitalization: Issues with reference to Navajo.

    With Marion K. Bittinger. Invited guest lecture, Anthropology 305: ‘Language & Culture’ Professor Amy L. Paugh, Department of Anthropology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA.

    (slides)

  18. Language endangerment: A history.

    Invited guest lecture, Anthropology 305: ‘Language & Culture’ Professor Amy L. Paugh, Department of Anthropology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA.

    (slides)

  19. A case study in digital collaboration: Navajo Language Renaissance & Rosetta Stone Navajo.

    With Lorraine Begay Manavi & Marion K. Bittinger. Stabilizing Indigenous Languages Symposium (SILS), Albuquerque, NM.

    (slides)

  20. Linguistic Institute 2011 overview.

    With Benjamin Keller. Overview of several courses attended at the LSA Linguistic Institute 2011, for the Content Development Department, Rosetta Stone, Harrisonburg, VA.

    (slides)

  21. Canonical typology.

    Lecture given to the Content Development department, Rosetta Stone, Harrisonburg, VA.

  22. Terrence Deacon, ‘Language origins: What coevolved, what devolved, and what’s universal’.

    Summary of Terrence Deacon’s plenary talk at the LSA Institute 2011, presented to the Content Development Department, Rosetta Stone, Harrisonburg, VA.

    (slides)

  23. Elicitation techniques.

    Invited talk, Content Development Department, Rosetta Stone, Harrisonburg, VA.

  24. Language revitalization: Navajo.

    With Marion K. Bittinger. Invited guest lecture, Anthropology 305: ‘Language & Culture’ Professor Amy L. Paugh, Department of Anthropology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA.

    (slides)

Reviews

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Projects

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  1. Rosetta Stone Iñupiaq (North Slope Iñupiatun).

    Rosetta Stone language-learning software for the Inupiaq language. Not available for public purchase. See the demo.

    (view online)

  2. Rosetta Stone Navajo (Diné bizaad).

    Rosetta Stone language-learning software for the Navajo language. Available for purchase here.

    (view online)

  3. Rosetta Stone Chitimacha (Sitimaxa).

    Rosetta Stone language-learning software for the Chitimacha language. Not available for public purchase.

Online Articles

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  1. A dying language is making a comeback.

    Time Magazine. Originally published in The Conversation as ‘Renaissance on the bayou: The revival of a lost language’. Also published in Language Magazine, The Houston Chronicle.

    (view online)

  2. Language revitalization in Africa.

    LSA Committee on Endangered Languages & their Preservation blog.

    (view online)

  3. The necessity of grammatical structures.

    Diversity Linguistics Comment.

    (view online)

  4. A world of words.

    Blog post written for the Rosetta Stone blog. (Left the company before it was published.)

  5. Language as action.

    Mises Daily, Ludwig von Mises Institute.

    (view online)

  6. Why do languages die?.

    Mises Daily, Ludwig von Mises Institute.

    (view online)

  7. Typology: The study of unity or diversity?.

    Diversity Linguistics Comment.

    (view online)

  8. English for all, freedom for none.

    Mises Daily, Ludwig von Mises Institute.

    (view online)

  9. Language and the socialist-calculation problem.

    Mises Daily, Ludwig von Mises Institute

    (view online)

Non-Linguistic Works

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  1. 18 going on 19.

    American Pilgrim Magazine, Vol. 1, No. 2 (Fall).

Unpublished Works

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  1. Building the lexicon for awakening languages.

    Chapter prepared for the Conference on Language Revitalization: Sleeping & Awakened Languages of the Gulf South, Tulane University. (Proceedings were never published.)

  2. The participle -k and the structuring of Chitimacha discourse.

    Term paper, ‘Syntax Beyond the Clause’, Prof. Marianne Mithun, Fall 2014, UC Santa Barbara.

  3. To be not or to not to be.

    Term paper, ‘Semantics’, Prof. Stefan Th. Gries, Winter 2015, UC Santa Barbara.

  4. Prosodic phrase types in Ékegusií.

    Term paper, ‘Advanced Phonology’, Prof. Matthew Gordon, Winter 2015, UC Santa Barbara.

  5. Assessing the Chitimacha-Totozoquean hypothesis.

    Term paper, ‘Language & Prehistory’, Prof. Laura Robinson, Spring 2014, UC Santa Barbara.

  6. Causativity and the origin of the causative suffix in Chitimacha.

    Term paper, ‘Advanced Syntax’, Prof. Marianne Mithun, Fall 2014, UC Santa Barbara.

  7. The U.S. Southeast as a linguistic area.

    Class presentation, ‘Language & Prehistory’, Prof. Laura Robinson, Winter 2014, UC Santa Barbara.

    (slides)

  8. Loan translations in the U.S. Southeast.

    Term paper, ‘Languages in Contact’, Prof. Marianne Mithun, Winter 2013, UC Santa Barbara.

  9. The processing of multicategorial roots in Swahili.

    Term paper, ‘Cognitive Foundations of Language’, Prof. Fermin Moscoso del Prado Martin, Fall 2014, UC Santa Barbara.

  10. Primitivism in linguistics and anthropology: The American tradition after Boas.

    Term paper, ‘Language as Culture’, Prof. John W. Dubois, Winter 2013, UC Santa Barbara.

  11. Reduplicative roots in Chitimacha.

    Term paper, ‘Introduction to Morphology’, Prof. Marianne Mithun, Spring 2014, UC Santa Barbara.

  12. Documenting conversational conventions in Swahili.

    Term paper, ‘Discourse Transcription’, Prof. John W. Dubois, Fall 2013, UC Santa Barbara.

  13. Topics as contrast in Chitimacha.

    Term paper, ‘Discourse’, Prof. Patricia Clancy, Fall 2013, UC Santa Barbara.

  14. Choctaw in syntactic typology.

    Term paper, ‘Syntactic Typology’, Prof. Irina Nikolaeva, LSA Institute 2011, University of Colorado, Boulder.

  15. The syntactic typology of Choctaw & Nankina.

    Term paper, ‘Syntactic Typology’, Prof. Irina Nikolaeva, LSA Linguistic Institute 2011, University of Colorado, Boulder.

  16. The Navajo language.

    Term paper, ‘Linguistic Anthropology’, Prof. Amy L. Paugh, Fall 2009, James Madison University.

  17. Teaching from difference.

    Term paper, ‘Linguistic Anthropology’, Prof. Amy L. Paugh, Fall 2009, James Madison University.

  18. Review of When languages die: The extinction of the world’s languages and the erosion of human knowledge.

  19. On the status of the subject agreement marker in Swahili.

    Term paper, ‘Advanced Syntax’, Prof. Ann M. Reed, Spring 2008, The College of William & Mary.

  20. A grammar of Turkish.

    Term paper, ‘Descriptive Linguistics’, Prof. Ann M. Reed, Fall 2007, The College of William & Mary.

  21. Review of Baboon metaphysics: The evolution of a social mind, by Dorothy L. Cheney & Robert M. Seyfarth.

    Term paper, ‘Science & Human Agency’, Prof. Paul S. Davies, Winter 2005, The College of William & Mary.

  22. Language change & variation in Mombasa: Recent trends in Kimvita Swahili.

    Independent study project, ‘Development, Health, & Society’, Spring 2007, School for International Training, Nairobi, Kenya.

  23. Discourse connectives and pragmatic implications.

    Term paper, ‘Semantics’, Prof. Ann M. Reed, Spring 2006, The College of William & Mary.

  24. What’s in a word? Code-switching in Mombasa Swahili.

    Term paper, ‘Swahili Language & Culture Studies’, Fall 2006, School for International Training, Mombasa, Kenya.

  25. Truth and the sentential hierarchy.

    Term paper, ‘Philosophy of Language’, Prof. Robert Maximilian de Gaynesford, Spring 2006, The College of William & Mary.

Media About Me

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  1. The three-minute challenge: Graduate student in linguistics goes on to compete in the first UC-wide competition on May 4, by Julie Cohen. UC Santa Barbara Current

  2. UCSB Ph.D. student Daniel Hieber takes second place in inaugural UC Grad Slam, by Patricia Marroquin. Noozhawk

  3. Grad Slam 2015 Final Round for UCSB: The right to represent, by Kyle Crocco. UCSB GradPost

  4. UC students’ research wows judges at Grad Slam competition, by Nanette Asimov. San Francisco Chronicle

  5. Graduate student in the spotlight: Daniel Hieber on revitalizing languages, rock climbing, and research motivation, by Melissa Rapp. UCSB GradPost

  6. 10 linguistics students receive NSF graduate fellowships, by Linguistic Society of America. LinguisticSociety.org

  7. UC Grad Slam tests scholars’ communication skills, by Carolyn McMillian. University of California Press Room

  8. CoLang 2014 scholarship recipients announced, by Linguistic Society of America. LinguisticSociety.org

  9. For UCSB linguistics Ph.D. student Daniel Hieber, a second-place win in inaugural UC Grad Slam was the ‘icing on the cake’, by Patricia Marroquin. UCSB GradPost

Professional Service

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  1. 2015—present

    Advisory Council, Institute for Collaborative Language Documentation (CoLang)

  2. 2014

    Proofreader, Language Science Press

  3. 2011—present

    Member, Website Creator, Webmaster, Social Media Subcommittee, LSA Committee on Endangered Languages & Their Preservation

  4. 2010—2011

    Reviewer, Libertarian Papers

  5. 2009—present

    Member, Website Creator, Webmaster, Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas (SSILA)

Fieldwork & Descriptive Work

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  1. 2015—2016

    Santa Barbara, California. One-year, graduate-level field methods class working with a speaker of Tlahuapa Mixtec.

  2. 2014

    Mombasa & Kisii, Kenya. Two months of fieldwork in western Kenya, recording conversation as well as traditional songs and folktales in Ékegusií.

  3. 2010

    Anchorage, AK. Two weeks of elicitation with a native speaker of the Point Hope dialect of Iñupiaq.

  4. 2008—2013

    Rosetta Stone. Daily elicitation with speakers of Navajo and Iñupiaq for the purpose of creating Rosetta Stone language software. Included both long-distance elicitation and numerous on-site visits, generally for two weeks at a time.

  5. 2008—present

    Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana. Ongoing preparation of a Chitimacha dictionary, text collection, and grammar from archival sources. Completed Rosetta Stone language-learning software in 2010.

  6. 2007

    Williamsburg, VA. An undergraduate-level descriptive linguistics / field methods course with a native speaker of Turkish.

  7. 2006—2007

    Mombasa, Kenya. Two semesters researching language shift in the Kimvita (Mombasa dialect of Swahili. Worked primarily with youth speakers collecting recorded texts for analysis.

Professional Memberships

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  1. Association for Linguistic Typology (ALT)

  2. Association for Contemporary African Linguistics (ACAL)

  3. Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas (SSILA)

  4. Foundation for Endangered Languages (FEL)

  5. Linguistic Society of America (LSA)

Languages Spoken & Studied

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  1. French (français)

    beginner

  2. Inuit (Iñupiaq)

    structural knowledge

  3. Turkish (Türkçe)

    structural knowledge

  4. Spanish (español)

    intermediate

  5. Kisii (Ékegusií)

    structural knowledge

  6. Swahili (Kiswahili)

    advanced

  7. Chitimacha (Sitimaxa)

    structural knowledge

  8. Latin (lingua Latina)

    intermediate

  9. Navajo (Diné bizaad)

    structural knowledge

  10. English (English)

    native

Technical Proficiencies

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Technical Skills

Software Proficiencies

References

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